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 Pakistan

■ A Type of Flood Peculiar to Mountainous Terrains   (2010/09/14)


Because the road disappeared, it takes hours and hours to get home.

After the floods damaged Pakistan, KnK started to provide educational assistance in Kohistan in the province of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. The county of Kohistan is abundant in nature and very beautiful. The Indus runs through high 3,000-4,000 meter mountains. However, people’s lives are extremely difficult as rough mountains prevent electricity and water services from being installed. Additionally, the region is close to the locations where small groups of extremists are active, and it is always in a dangerous state with military troops and police armed with guns.

The Indus tributaries flooded and washed away schools and houses.
A part of the village was buried due to a landslide.
Children who lost their houses are living in the camp.

Kohistan was devastated by large-scale floods mainly along the Indus and its tributaries. Because the terrain is mountainous, a great number of landslides and mudslides occurred and some villages were smashed by huge rocks loosened by landslides. As well, many side roads


Abdora Aziz, worried
that his school may not start.

toward the mountainside and off the main roads are badly damaged. The people living on the mountainside not only had their houses washed away but are also having a hard time going back and forth between their residential areas and the foot of the mountains.

The schools destroyed in Kohistan have been closed for three months, including summer vacation, but are expected to remain closed until September 20th. “Without school, I feel bored every day,” says Abdora Aziz, eight years old, worried that his collapsed school may not open on the 21st.

School partially destroyed by the flooded river

During our survey, schools that had been destroyed in the 2005 earthquake were also studied. They were never refurbished after the earthquake and the children were forced to study in the collapsed school building and tents. The flood this summer washed away the tents, desks, and school materials, and reopening of the schools is under threat.

School destroyed in the earthquake five years ago

As the first step, KnK will supply about thirty affected schools with tents and materials to help create a learning environment for the children. We are working so that the children can start living ordinary lives as quickly as possible.

Reported by Kyo Shimizu


Please contribute to the emergency aid that supports child survivors.

The area affected by the floods makes up one fifth of the national land area of Pakistan, and it is estimated that 6 million of the 15.4 to 20 million survivors are children.
Yet another disaster has struck the people of Pakistan as they were struggling to recover from the damage caused by the great earthquake in 2005. It is feared that damage is still spreading and that a complete recovery will take a long time.
Pakistan, together with neighboring Afghanistan and India, is thought to be a keystone of world peace and stability. For peace and stability, and for children to play important roles in the future of the country and the region, there should never be a lack of access to education. KnK has been providing educational opportunities and mental health care to approximately 2,500 children in Pakistan since the great earthquake in 2005. For our new emergency aid project, we will continue to work mainly for educational assistance, with our local partner, offering assistance to affected schools, such as tents.
What drives children in the crisis of poverty and disaster into the deepest despair is indifference from the world around them. Please give generous support to the child survivors in Pakistan.

Please enter “Pakistan Floods” in the remarks box.

 
 
 
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